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Fuel System

GOING IN THE TANK

More than one technical article has been written about gas tanks. Some of these articles would lead you to believe that a foam-filled fuel cell is the only solution, and others give you the impression that any tank will work as long as you have a high-dollar, killer fuel pump. However, we believe that the truth lies somewhere between these two opinions.

Boost in a Box

While at LS Fest, we noticed several drivers spending a lot of time tuning their rides before hitting the track, dialing them in to try and gain an edge over the competition. This left us puzzled. If you’re looking for an edge, there’s no better way to optimize your performance with E85 than with a flex fuel system from Advanced Fuel Dynamics.

HOLLEY CARB TUNING

Holley carburetors have long been a staple in the go-fast world of high-performance motoring, whether it’s NASCAR, drag racing or on the street. Much like other performance-oriented products—perhaps even more so with a carburetor—a carburetor requires a fundamental setup and a degree of maintenance, and that’s considering you have chosen the correct-size carburetor for your application, at least to get it in the ballpark. Knowing how to adjust, maintain and even repair your Holley carburetor goes a long way toward helping to ensure that your carburetor will make optimum horsepower for a long time. Because of this, we decided to compile a few troubleshooting and repair tips for the popular 4150-series Holley carburetor, which is the series designation for Holley’s street/strip and racing carburetors.

MAKING GAS

Alternative-fuel sources and hybrid cars are all the rage today. Everyone from major automakers to backyard inventors is pursuing alternative fuels and energy sources. While the ultimate goal is generally to eliminate dependence on foreign oil, for hot rodders there is also the desire to invent and create a better-performing engine.

THE HYDROGEN HIGHBOY

Enter Carl Casper, a man best known for building custom cars and promoting his huge custom car show every year in Louisville, Kentucky. Casper has long been a self-thinker and innovator with plenty of experience under his belt, and he was intrigued with the concept of alternative fuels, hydrogen in particular. During our conversation with Casper, he summed it when he said, “I feel many of the solutions will come out of the car guys. I want the mechanical wizards who have taken street rodding and auto racing to the highest levels imaginable to start putting their creativity into alternative-energy systems. I’m putting my money on them. Everyone seems to be waiting for the big corporations to pull us out of this energy crisis, and they tend to forget that from the very beginning of time it’s often the little guy with a shop behind his house who creates the next great idea or invention of our time.”

CLASSIC HOT ROD CRUISER

The pictured F-100 is a 1954 model, and it was purchased by Carl and Marianne Lewis from Milwaukie, Oregon, in 1992. The truck had seen better days, as it had been sitting out in the elements under an awning next to a storage shed. In primer, and with a transplanted 289 small block, the truck was partially disassembled as it sat on four flat tires. It had not been moved for some 10 years. Mel Nichols was hired for the much needed makeover, which took 3-1/2 years to complete.

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THE GRILLEMEISTER

Those who longed for their engines to look as they did back in the old days of multiple-carb setups were out of luck. Cool as they were to look at, there are lots of reasons why the multi-carb setup fell out of favor, and most of them had to do with the fact that they were a bear to sync. The advent of the four-barrel carb was the death for these systems, though the purists among us prayed for a breakthrough. Thanks to Ken Farrell and his company, Retro Tek, those prayers have been answered. Farrell started off converting old mechanical fuel injection systems (Hilborn & Enderle) when the first aftermarket EFI systems became available. His new system, which uses the latest in EFI mated together with the classic Stromburg 97 design, came about when Farrell saw that there was interest in the benefits of EFI, but he also knew that they were lacking in the looks department. The idea was simple take the best aspects of both and add them together.

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HOT & HAMMERED

The Modtiques of Eastern Pennsylvania have been producing a quality rod run for the past several years. It’s the quintessential “small rod run” produced by a local club that draws quality cars to comfortable venues. The quality of cars and people is high, and many of rodders who attend the event do so annually, making it a long-standing tradition in the process. Author Photography by Walt Winklespecht The Rodder’s Cup is the top award for the event, and some 30 or so years ago, we entered into an interesting partnership with the Modtiques, whereby we agreed to feature the street rod that captured the award. It has made for an interesting selection of hot rods, and this year is no exception. The club members chose the car, and it seems—for the most part—the cars chosen have a common thread or two. First, it seems the Modtiques have a thirst for real hot rods, as most of its selections tend to have “very healthy” powerplants. Second, chopped tops and often non-Fords come to the forefront, making the Rodder’s Cup an award that has been bestowed upon a diverse selection of cars. This year was no exception, and Bob Naudascher’s bright red ’41 Chevrolet sedan encompasses all of the things one has come to expect of a Rodder’s Cup winner. The sedan cuts a wicked profile with a chopped top, no bumpers and bright red paint—all adding to the look. Under the hood, a hot tunnel ram fed small block is found, and making all this even better, the car is a homebuilt hot rod. When Bob Naudascher hauled home his self-described rust bucket, it was far from show quality. The typical oxidation process had taken its toll on the car with the floors and lower extremities of the body requiring replacement. After repairing the considerable rust and getting the body structurally sound with all panel gaps fitting perfectly, Naudascher had Jack Consonza and Carl Chuppa drop the top on the sedan two inches. In the process, the front vent windows were eliminated. While the sheetmetal was being moved, front fenders were molded, the headlights frenched and the hood was filled and shaved of all trim. The stock grille remains but has been relieved of all stainless steel in favor of a monochromatic approach. Moving toward the rear of the car, all side trim was removed, and the door handles were shaved. Lower rocker moldings were given the deep six and the rear decklid is now devoid of any hardware. The stock taillights remain, but have been lowered on the body, and the rear pan was rolled after eliminating the rear bumper. When the body was finally smoothed, straightened and fit the Viper Red DuPont paint was applied by Jack Consonza and Carl Chuppa. “Scotty the Striper” from York, Pennsylvania added the pinstriping and small graphic to the sides of the sedan. Under the bright red Chevrolet is a state-of-the-art street rod chassis. Front suspension comes from Heidt’s Hot Rod Shop, and the fully independent suspension provides handling, ride and good braking all in one package. Out back, a kit from Chassis Engineering locates the 9-inch Ford rear via parallel leaf springs and tube shocks. Power for the sedan comes in the form of a ’78 vintage 355 cubic inch small-block Chevrolet. The over-bored 0.030 engine runs stock heads and a 350hp cam. MSD provides the hot spark, and between the heads, a tunnel ram intake mounts a pair of Holley carbs. A neat homebuilt aluminum air breather houses K&N filter elements and polished no-name valve covers keep things simple. A Walker radiator cools the small block and noise suppression comes from a set of stainless steel mufflers. Behind the small block, a rebuilt Turbo-400 transmission handles the shifting chores. After the body and chassis were completed, the sedan was taken to W.N.J. Upholstery in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, to upholster the stock seats in a horizontal pleated design. The smoothed and filled dashboard now carries a full set of Stewart-Warner gauges and a controller for the Vintage Air heat and AC system. Power windows from Juliano’s drop the glass and Big Al’s door handles add a bit of billet to the interior. An owner-installed American Autowire harness and panel control the entire electrical system. A LeCarra wheel in matching gray leather tops the steering column while the column shifter selects the gear. It took Bob Naudascher four years to bring his sedan back to life, but in the end, the effort was well worthwhile. The Viper red sedan is a great example of Chevrolet’s last year of full production, prior to WWII and beyond. It is a classic example of fat-fendered hot rodding. The chopped top, the tunnel ram motor and everything in between simply make the winner of the Rodder’s Cup for 2003 hot and hammered.   ARTICLE SOURCES

Action Packed

While the factory cast-iron four-barrel Q-Jet intake manifolds have performed admirably on literally thousands of GM applications—and if you are picking your engine from a used lot to use in a swap, it will likely be so equipped—every last one of them should be torn off the car and thrown in the dumpster.

Good As Gold

Tech presentation is something anyone can do to his or her existing Camaro, since it takes no special skill, yet the results are worthwhile. Those are the rewards of personalizing a cool Chevy, and it’s what drives us in the first place to tackle such jobs.

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